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third person point of view

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Definition:

The third person point of view is a form of storytelling in which a narrator relates all action in third person, using third person pronouns such as "he" or "she." Third person point of view may be omniscient or limited. Often new writers feel most comfortable with first person, but writing in the third person allows a writer more freedom in how a story is told.

If you're unsure about which is right for your story, read an article on choosing a point of view, or a discussion on point of view in response to a blog post.

Examples:
Jane Austen's novel, Pride and Prejudice, like many classic novels, is told from the third person point of view:
When Jane and Elizabeth were alone, the former, who had been cautious in her praise of Mr. Bingley before, expressed to her sister how very much she admired him.

"He is just what a young man ought to be," said she, "sensible, good humoured, lively; and I never saw such happy manners! -- so much ease, with such perfect good breeding!"

Still have questions about third person? Read some more examples of third person from classic fiction.

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